Hearing Aid Styles

1. Completely In The Canal (CIC)

  • Cosmetically appealing – invisible
  • Easy telephone use
  • Shorter battery life
  • Occasionally wax may build up

This is the smallest hearing aid available on the market today. It is designed to be fitted inside the canal. As a result, it is very hard to see.

Advantages
This kind of hearing aid is nearly invisible to the eye. A CIC hearing aid uses the natural shape of the ear to capture sounds. This means that your directionality will be enhanced. A patient fitted with a CIC will be able to use the phone without any adjustments.

Disadvantages
Some types of canal shapes exclude the use of a CIC. On most brands, the battery life is very short. Also, because the hearing aid is so small, the running price is a bit higher than your average hearing aid.

 

2. In The Canal (ITC)/Half Shell (HS)

  • Slightly visible
  • Easy telephone use
  • Requires dexterity to insert
  • Wireless communication available

In theory, this kind of hearing aid only takes up space in the ear's canal. However, it does slightly jut out of the canal. The cosmetic appeal of these particular hearing aids is heavily dependent on the manufacturer and the anatomy of the client's ear canal.

Advantages
Generally speaking, this device is cosmetically appealing.

Disadvantages
These hearing aids can be more susceptible to feedback or whistling. Audio control can be difficult for those with arthritis.

 

3. Full Shell In The Ear

  • Visible
  • Easy to handle
  • Longer battery life
  • Wireless communication available
  • More power

This larger-style hearing aid sits in the bowl of the ear.

Advantages
It is a powerful hearing aid with large controls. Controls can be placed on the hearing aid to make them less prone to feedback or whistling noises.

Disadvantages
The hearing aid is large, making is less aesthetically pleasing.

 

4. Micro Behind The Ear (microBTE)

  • Cosmetically appealing
  • Easy to insert
  • Wireless communication can be available

 

5. Behind The Ear (BTE)

  • Cosmetically appealing – slightly visible
  • Easy to handle
  • Wireless communication available

 

A BTE hearing aid is tucked behind the ear and connected to an ear mold. Essentially, the ear mold plums sound directly into the ear while the device rests behind the ear.

Advantages
Often times, BTEs are high-powered hearing aids. More power can greatly benefit those suffering severe hearing loss. The BTE is less prone to whistling or feedback.

Disadvantages
Clients with smaller ears can have difficulty using a BTE while wearing glasses.

 

6. Power Behind The Ear (Power BTE)

  • Cosmetically appealing – slightly visible
  • Easy to handle
  • Durable
  • Wireless communication available

 

7. Micro In The Canal (MIC)

  • Cosmetically appealing – nearly invisible
  • Easy telephone use
  • Requires good dexterity to insert
  • Short battery life
  • Occasionally wax may build up

 

8. Micro Behind The Ear (Water Resistant)

  • Cosmetically appealing – slightly visible
  • Easy to handle
  • Wireless communication available
  • Water Resistant-Ingress Protection Rating of IP67

 

9. Extended Wear

  • Completely invisible
  • No batteries to change
  • No daily insertion

 

« Back to Resources